Discovery Green

Discovery Green

Discovery Green has become Houston’s beloved central park, transforming a sea of surface parking adjacent to the George R. Brown Convention Center into one of Houston’s most vibrant urban districts.  Over 400 annual programmed events and activities supplement the park’s fixed amenities to create a regional destination attracting over a million annual visitors.  New residential, office, and hotel towers adjacent to the park represent over a billion dollars of follow-on private redevelopment.  The park’s positive influence is felt throughout the downtown core. 

The park was developed by the Discovery Green Conservancy in ongoing partnership with the City of Houston.  Jacob Petersen was Principal-in-Charge of the extensive Discovery Green Design Team from Schematic Design through Construction Observation, with prime firm Hargreaves Associates.  PageSoutherlandPage led the design of park architecture.  The $53M fast-track park + garage project was completed in 34 months. 

Photo: Katya Horner

Lake

Lake

A native riparian edge buffers the lake from perimeter traffic, while interior lake edges connect the Lakehouse Café, the stage, and Crawford Promenade.  Built-in infrastructure allows a portion of the lake to be converted into an ice skating rink between Thanksgiving and New Years Day.  Cypress-lined boardwalks, piers, and floating water gardens anchor the lake within the regional gulf coast vernacular.      

Photo: Jacob Petersen 

Lake

Lake

A native riparian edge buffers the lake from perimeter traffic, while interior lake edges connect the Lakehouse Café, the stage, and Crawford Promenade.  Built-in infrastructure allows a portion of the lake to be converted into an ice skating rink between Thanksgiving and New Years Day.  Cypress-lined boardwalks, piers, and floating water gardens anchor the lake within the regional gulf coast vernacular.      

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Crawford Promenade

Crawford Promenade

The Crawford Promenade is Discovery Green’s circulation spine, linking primary destinations and activities.  Park amenities include two restaurants, a park office building, a great lawn for civic-scale events and active recreation, an outdoor stage and landform amphitheater for daily performances, dog runs, picnic areas, a lake with boardwalks and water gardens, an iconic interactive water feature and adjacent playground for children, several major public art works, and two acres of themed horticultural gardens.

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Interactive Fountian

Interactive Fountian

The Interactive Fountain is the heart of Discovery Green’s Family Area, which includes a Central Flyway-themed play area, picnic tables, dog runs, and artist Doug Hollis’ Mist Tree sculpture.  The Interactive Fountain is programmed to create both a low interwoven web of water, and an iconic display of larger civic-scaled jets visible from surrounding streets and towers.  The Mist Tree creates a cylinder of mist and rain in the abstracted form of a steel tree.  These sculptural water features are often crowded with hundreds of regional children and parents, enjoying the cooling playscape within Houston’s characteristically hot summer and fall climate.

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Mist Tree

Mist Tree

The Interactive Fountain is the heart of Discovery Green’s Family Area, which includes a Central Flyway-themed play area, picnic tables, dog runs, and artist Doug Hollis’ Mist Tree sculpture.  The Interactive Fountain is programmed to create both a low interwoven web of water, and an iconic display of larger civic-scaled jets visible from surrounding streets and towers.  The Mist Tree creates a cylinder of mist and rain in the abstracted form of a steel tree.  These sculptural water features are often crowded with hundreds of regional children and parents, enjoying the cooling playscape within Houston’s characteristically hot summer and fall climate.

Photo: Richard Petersen

Stage

Stage

Hundreds of free annual performances and events are hosted at the outdoor stage and landform seating slope.  Performances on the open-sided stage activate the park in all directions, such that visitors eating at the Lakehouse Café, or strolling along the Promenade are able to equally enjoy the entertainment.  The lake, interactive fountain, and downtown skyline provide a dramatic backdrop to the stage.        

Photo: Richard Petersen

Great Lawn

Great Lawn

The Great Lawn’s large flat expanse accommodates diverse informal recreational needs such as pick-up sports, frisbee, kite flying, and sunbathing, as well as large organized exercise classes, and high profile civic festivals and events including recent performances by Kings of Leon and Lyell Lovett.  Electrical infrastructure, tent sleeves, and turf reinforcement are built into the lawn to facilitate events while minimizing event-related maintenance.  Mast lighting extends use of the lawn into the evening.    

Photo: Jacob Petersen        

Oak Allee and "The Grove"

Oak Allee and "The Grove"

The Oak Allee Promenade invites visitors to stroll and relax beneath the majestic canopy of heritage oaks, cherished remnants of a previous era.  The large dining room windows of The Grove restaurant and the Treehouse upstairs are nestled into the overhanging oak branches, giving the restaurant its unparalleled downtown setting. 

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Oak Allee and "The Grove"

Oak Allee and "The Grove"

The Oak Allee Promenade invites visitors to stroll and relax beneath the majestic canopy of heritage oaks, cherished remnants of a previous era.  The large dining room windows of The Grove restaurant and the Treehouse upstairs are nestled into the overhanging oak branches, giving the restaurant its unparalleled downtown setting. 

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Urban Gardens

Urban Gardens

The Urban Gardens integrate small scale recreation, public art, a garden fountain, and intimate seating spaces within a rich garden context of flowering trees and themed horticultural gardens.  A grove of native loblolly pine trees hosts weekly markets.  The adjacent event lawn provides spill-out space for The Grove restaurant, and has become a popular venue private parties and weddings.

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Underground Garage and Park Construction

Underground Garage and Park Construction

A 620-car underground garage is seamlessly integrated with surface park amenities to accommodate the parking needs of the adjacent George R. Brown Convention Center, proximate sports venues, and park events.  This exceptional degree of integration resulted from the simultaneous design of park and garage under the leadership of the park design team.  Surface manifestations of the garage were transformed into park amenities: the 3-lane garage entrance ramp creates the landform seating slope for the stage, and garage stairwells were transformed into polychromatic public art works by regional artist Margo Sawyer.  Many park visitors are surprised to realize that a third of the park is actually constructed over the garage.

Photo: City of Houston

 

Belo Garden

Belo Garden

Belo Garden is a 1.75-acre oasis in the heart of downtown Dallas, one of three recently-completed urban parks created through the implementation of the Downtown Dallas Park Master Plan.  Sinuous drifts of prairie-inspired native grasses and perennials and groves of native trees give the park its unique regional identity.  The central plaza at the confluence of the park’s flowing paths is activated by dramatic leaf-shaped fountains which emerge from the plaza paving to the delight of children and park visitors. 

Jacob Petersen was Principal-in-Charge of the Belo Garden Design Team from Schematic Design through Construction Observation, with prime firm Hargreaves Associates.  Belo Garden was developed through a public-private partnership between Belo Corp and the City of Dallas.   

Belo Garden

Belo Garden

Belo Garden is a 1.75-acre oasis in the heart of downtown Dallas, one of three recently-completed urban parks created through the implementation of the Downtown Dallas Park Master Plan.  Sinuous drifts of prairie-inspired native grasses and perennials and groves of native trees give the park its unique regional identity.  The central plaza at the confluence of the park’s flowing paths is activated by dramatic leaf-shaped fountains which emerge from the plaza paving to the delight of children and park visitors. 

Jacob Petersen was Principal-in-Charge of the Belo Garden Design Team from Schematic Design through Construction Observation, with prime firm Hargreaves Associates.  Belo Garden was developed through a public-private partnership between Belo Corp and the City of Dallas.   

Photo: Justin Terveen

Belo Garden in Spring

Belo Garden in Spring

The gardens are designed for four-season interest, transitioning from the exuberant greens of spring growth, to the multi-colored flowering perennials and maturing seed heads of early summer, to the reds and oranges of fall leaf change, and finally to the subtle browns and yellows of winter.  The extensive use of native plants minimizes maintenance and water consumption, and anchors the gardens within the broader regional ecology.

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Belo Garden in Early Summer

Belo Garden in Early Summer

The gardens are designed for four-season interest, transitioning from the exuberant greens of spring growth, to the multi-colored flowering perennials and maturing seed heads of early summer, to the reds and oranges of fall leaf change, and finally to the subtle browns and yellows of winter.  The extensive use of native plants minimizes maintenance and water consumption, and anchors the gardens within the broader regional ecology.

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Belo Garden in Winter

Belo Garden in Winter

The gardens are designed for four-season interest, transitioning from the exuberant greens of spring growth, to the multi-colored flowering perennials and maturing seed heads of early summer, to the reds and oranges of fall leaf change, and finally to the subtle browns and yellows of winter.  The extensive use of native plants minimizes maintenance and water consumption, and anchors the gardens within the broader regional ecology.

Photo: Jacob Petersen          

Fountain Plaza

Fountain Plaza

A central plaza at the confluence of the park’s flowing paths is activated by dramatic leaf-shaped fountains which emerge from the plaza paving to the delight of children and park visitors.  The cascading waters of the fountain soften street noise, and elegantly curved benches set beneath overhanging branches of native Shumard Oaks provide shaded seating along plaza and path edges.  The fountain is simply turned off to accommodate plaza events such as music performances and weddings.  The hill serves as an informal amphitheater overlooking plaza and fountain activities

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Fountain Plaza

Fountain Plaza

A central plaza at the confluence of the park’s flowing paths is activated by dramatic leaf-shaped fountains which emerge from the plaza paving to the delight of children and park visitors.  The cascading waters of the fountain soften street noise, and elegantly curved benches set beneath overhanging branches of native Shumard Oaks provide shaded seating along plaza and path edges.  The fountain is simply turned off to accommodate plaza events such as music performances and weddings.  The hill serves as an informal amphitheater overlooking plaza and fountain activities

Photo: Richard Petersen   

Fountain Plaza

Fountain Plaza

A central plaza at the confluence of the park’s flowing paths is activated by dramatic leaf-shaped fountains which emerge from the plaza paving to the delight of children and park visitors.  The cascading waters of the fountain soften street noise, and elegantly curved benches set beneath overhanging branches of native Shumard Oaks provide shaded seating along plaza and path edges.  The fountain is simply turned off to accommodate plaza events such as music performances and weddings.  The hill serves as an informal amphitheater overlooking plaza and fountain activities

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Garden Grove

Garden Grove

A granite wall along the east edge of the park encloses the edge of the Garden Grove seating area, and separates it from the adjacent service drive.  Every afternoon the wall is animated by the dancing shadows of the elm branches blowing in Dallas’ ever-present breezes.  

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Garden Grove

Garden Grove

A granite wall along the east edge of the park encloses the edge of the Garden Grove seating area, and separates it from the adjacent service drive.  Every afternoon the wall is animated by the dancing shadows of the elm branches blowing in Dallas’ ever-present breezes.  

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Belo Garden Streetscapes

Belo Garden Streetscapes

Belo Garden is a 1.75-acre oasis in the heart of downtown Dallas, one of three recently-completed urban parks created through the implementation of the Downtown Dallas Park Master Plan.  Sinuous drifts of prairie-inspired native grasses and perennials and groves of native trees give the park its unique regional identity.  The central plaza at the confluence of the park’s flowing paths is activated by dramatic leaf-shaped fountains which emerge from the plaza paving to the delight of children and park visitors. 

Jacob Petersen was Principal-in-Charge of the Belo Garden Design Team from Schematic Design through Construction Observation, with prime firm Hargreaves Associates.  Belo Garden was developed through a public-private partnership between Belo Corp and the City of Dallas.  

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Belo Garden Identity

Belo Garden Identity

Flowing paths, drifts of native grasses and perennials, and the iconic leaf fountain provide dramatic visual relief within downtown Dallas’ street and building grid, particularly when viewed from surrounding office towers.   

Belo Garden Sustainability

Belo Garden Sustainability

Belo Garden establishes a high bar for park sustainability.  The post-industrial brownfield site was extensively remediated in preparation for park development.  The design minimizes water and energy consumption with native and regionally adapted plant materials, water recycling and stormwater capture at the interactive fountain, dry wells to enhance on-site infiltration, locally-quarried granite and decomposed granite, and carefully calibrated lighting levels.

Photo: Justin Terveen

Elizabeth Caruthers Park

Elizabeth Caruthers Park

Elizabeth Caruthers Park is the central park of Portland’s bustling South Waterfront Redevelopment District, the largest urban renewal project in the city’s history.  Over the past decade the South Waterfront has been transformed from a largely-isolated industrial brownfield into a high-density mixed-use transit-oriented urban neighborhood, defined by a commitment to sustainable urban living.  The park supports the expanding neighborhood and encourages full buildout of the city’s long-term redevelopment strategy. 

The 2-acre park was developed by Portland Parks and Recreation and Portland Development Commission.  Jacob Petersen was Principal-in-Charge of the Caruthers Park Design Team from Schematic Design through Construction Observation, with prime firm Hargreaves Associates.  Lango Hanson Associates served as the local landscape consultant.    

Photo: Bruce Forster

Elizabeth Caruthers Park

Elizabeth Caruthers Park

The serpentine grain of the park’s plantings and paths references the adjacent meandering Willamette River.  The Urban Garden occupies the sunnier downtown end of the park, integrating three shaded program nodes within a rich 4-season perennial garden: a Community Gathering space with movable tables and chairs and a bocce court, an Environmental Play Area with a small interactive fountain and play logs, and a Garden Retreat for reading and relaxing.  The Naturalized Landscape occupies the shadier and windier edges of the site, with boardwalks traversing undulating topography and a mosaic of native woodland plantings.  The Multi-Use Lawn is the heart of the park, accommodating outdoor events and activities, dog walking, and all types of informal recreation.  The landform along provides a seating slope overlooking the lawn, and views to the river basin.  

Photo: Bruce Forster      

Urban Garden

Urban Garden

The Urban Garden occupies the sunnier downtown end of the park, integrating three shaded program nodes within a rich 4-season perennial garden: a Community Gathering space with movable tables and chairs and a bocce court, an Environmental Play Area with a small interactive fountain and play logs for neighborhood kids, and a Garden Retreat with stone terraces for reading and relaxing.   

Photo: Bruce Forster

Urban Garden

Urban Garden

The Urban Garden occupies the sunnier downtown end of the park, integrating three shaded program nodes within a rich 4-season perennial garden: a Community Gathering space with movable tables and chairs and a bocce court, an Environmental Play Area with a small interactive fountain and play logs for neighborhood kids, and a Garden Retreat with stone terraces for reading and relaxing.   

Photo: Bruce Forster

Environmental Play Area

Environmental Play Area

The Environmental Play area encourages children to create their own play through interface with natural elements of wood, stone, and water.  The centerpiece of the Environmental Play Area is the interactive fountain, a shallow circular pool of water with randomly scattered jumping stones - a concept derived from regional Cascade streams.  Motion-activated water jets enliven the fountain when children approach.  Overlapping play logs, referencing regional coniferous forests, invite children to jump, balance, and chase, while providing informal seating for parents.  

Photo: Bruce Forster

Environmental Play Area

Environmental Play Area

The Environmental Play area encourages children to create their own play through interface with natural elements of wood, stone, and water.  The centerpiece of the Environmental Play Area is the interactive fountain, a shallow circular pool of water with randomly scattered jumping stones - a concept derived from regional Cascade streams.  Motion-activated water jets enliven the fountain when children approach.  Overlapping play logs, referencing regional coniferous forests, invite children to jump, balance, and chase, while providing informal seating for parents.      

Photo: Bruce Forster

Multi-Use Lawn

Multi-Use Lawn

The Multi-Use Lawn occupies the center of the park, accommodating outdoor events and activities, sun bathing, dog walking, and all types of informal recreation.  A landform provides sloped seating overlooking the lawn with views out to the adjacent Willamette River basin.  The park is a prime neighborhood event venue and hosts a weekly farmer’s market and seasonal movie and music series.      

Photo: Bruce Forster

Multi-Use Lawn

Multi-Use Lawn

The Multi-Use Lawn occupies the center of the park, accommodating outdoor events and activities, sun bathing, dog walking, and all types of informal recreation.  A landform provides sloped seating overlooking the lawn with views out to the adjacent Willamette River basin.  The park is a prime neighborhood event venue and hosts a weekly farmer’s market and seasonal movie and music series.      

Photo: Bruce Forster

Neighborhood Events

Neighborhood Events

The park is a prime neighborhood event venue and hosts a weekly farmer’s market and seasonal movie and music series.    

Photo: Bruce Forster 

Naturalized Landscape

Naturalized Landscape

The Naturalized Landscape occupies the shadier and windier edges of the site, with boardwalks traversing undulating topography and a mosaic of native woodland plantings.  Song Cycles designed by public artist Doug Hollis, convert breezes into a delicate chimes within the tree canopies, as a play on Portland’s bicycle heritage.  All on-site stormwater is consolidated and conveyed to infiltration gardens set within the Naturalized Landscape, minimizing runoff to the adjacent Willamette River.  

Photo: Bruce Forster

Naturalized Landscape

Naturalized Landscape

The Naturalized Landscape occupies the shadier and windier edges of the site, with boardwalks traversing undulating topography and a mosaic of native woodland plantings.  Song Cycles designed by public artist Doug Hollis, convert breezes into a delicate chimes within the tree canopies, as a play on Portland’s bicycle heritage.  All on-site stormwater is consolidated and conveyed to infiltration gardens set within the Naturalized Landscape, minimizing runoff to the adjacent Willamette River.  

Photo: Bruce Forster

Sustainability

Sustainability

The park’s sustainability features represent the values of the larger Portland community.  All on-site stormwater is consolidated and conveyed to infiltration gardens set within Naturalized Landscape, minimizing runoff to the adjacent Willamette River.  Low-energy fluorescent and induction lighting minimizes electrical consumption, and the motion-activated water feature operates only when children are present.  Irrigation and maintenance are minimized through the use of native and regionally adapted plants.

Photo: Jacob Petersen 

San Diego CAC Waterfront Park

San Diego CAC Waterfront Park

The $49M San Diego CAC Waterfront Park and garage transformed acres of surface parking surrounding the landmark County Administration Center into downtown San Diego’s signature waterfront park.  The park celebrates the iconic Administration Center at its heart, with the north/south axis of the building extended across the site as the Promenade and Civic Fountain, a grand gesture of cascading water linking the open expanse of the Civic Green along the waterfront, to the more intimate garden rooms along the park’s interior edge.     

The 17-acre park has become a wildly popular regional destination and downtown event venue since its opening in 2014.  Jacob Petersen was Principal-in-Charge of the Waterfront Park Design Team, with prime firm Hargreaves Associates.  Davis Davis Architects led the design of the park architecture and the garage.

 

Pre-development Site Conditions

Pre-development Site Conditions

For the previous 80 years, the County Administration Center was surrounded by two large surface parking lots, providing convenient parking for CAC employees and visitors.  The Waterfront Park transformed this sea of parking into an open space legacy for regional residents and visitors.  Surface parking was replaced by a garage below the south half of the park and a large multi-level garage two blocks to the east.  The park’s success provides additional support for ongoing waterfront and downtown revitalization efforts.

 

San Diego CAC Waterfront Park

San Diego CAC Waterfront Park

The $49M San Diego CAC Waterfront Park and garage transformed acres of surface parking surrounding the landmark County Administration Center into downtown San Diego’s signature waterfront park.  The park celebrates the iconic Administration Center at its heart, with the north/south axis of the building extended across the site as the Promenade and Civic Fountain, a grand gesture of cascading water linking the open expanse of the Civic Green along the waterfront, to the more intimate garden rooms along the park’s interior edge.     

The 17-acre park has become a wildly popular regional destination and downtown event venue since its opening in 2014.  Jacob Petersen was Principal-in-Charge of the Waterfront Park Design Team, with prime firm Hargreaves Associates.  Davis Davis Architects led the design of the park architecture and the garage.

Photo: Jacob Petersen

North Promenade

North Promenade

The Promenade and Civic Fountain extend wing-like from the CAC building in a grand civic gesture of cascading water.  Fast-growing Tipu trees planted along Promenade edges provide a lightly-shaded canopy over the Promenade and Fountain seating terraces, and an attractive display of bright yellow flowers each spring.  The Promenade and eastern half of the park are slightly elevated to facilitate connections to building entrances, while enhancing views across the Civic Green to the bay beyond.  

Photo: Jacob Petersen

 

 

 

South Promenade

South Promenade

The Promenade and Civic Fountain extend wing-like from the CAC building in a grand civic gesture of cascading water.  Fast-growing Tipu trees planted along Promenade edges provide a lightly-shaded canopy over the Promenade and Fountain seating terraces, and an attractive display of bright yellow flowers each spring.  The Promenade and eastern half of the park are slightly elevated to facilitate connections to building entrances, while enhancing views across the Civic Green to the bay beyond.  

Photo: Jacob Petersen

 

 

 

Park Support Buildings

Park Support Buildings

Small park buildings integrating snack bar concessions, park information, restrooms and changing rooms are attached to the North and South Promenades to support park activities and provide functional services for park users.  The buildings were carefully designed by Davis Davis Architects to be materially complementary to the landmark CAC building, while reinforcing the contemporary design vocabulary of the park.    

Photo: Jacob Petersen       

 

 

 

  

Civic Fountain

Civic Fountain

The Civic Fountain functions as downtown San Diego’s urban beach, an interactive water-play feature scaled to accommodate hundreds of regional children.  Terraces along one edge of the fountain provide casual seating for park visitors and parents supervising children.  On windy days and during off-peak park use periods the fountain transforms into a shallow reflecting pool, conceptually drawing the surface of the adjacent bay into the heart of the park, and capturing the drama of San Diego’s colorful sunsets.  Sloped hardwood bridges cross the fountain basin at primary path corridors, linking the higher Promenade with the lower Civic Green.  Bridges allow all park users to experience the activity of the fountain interior from a dry prospect, adding a dramatic flair to park circulation, while referencing the waterfront’s pier and boardwalk heritage.

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Civic Fountain

Civic Fountain

The Civic Fountain functions as downtown San Diego’s urban beach, an interactive water-play feature scaled to accommodate hundreds of regional children.  Terraces along one edge of the fountain provide casual seating for park visitors and parents supervising children.  On windy days and during off-peak park use periods the fountain transforms into a shallow reflecting pool, conceptually drawing the surface of the adjacent bay into the heart of the park, and capturing the drama of San Diego’s colorful sunsets.  Sloped hardwood bridges cross the fountain basin at primary path corridors, linking the higher Promenade with the lower Civic Green.  Bridges allow all park users to experience the activity of the fountain interior from a dry prospect, adding a dramatic flair to park circulation, while referencing the waterfront’s pier and boardwalk heritage.

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Civic Fountain

Civic Fountain

The Civic Fountain functions as downtown San Diego’s urban beach, an interactive water-play feature scaled to accommodate hundreds of regional children.  Terraces along one edge of the fountain provide casual seating for park visitors and parents supervising children.  On windy days and during off-peak park use periods the fountain transforms into a shallow reflecting pool, conceptually drawing the surface of the adjacent bay into the heart of the park, and capturing the drama of San Diego’s colorful sunsets.  Sloped hardwood bridges cross the fountain basin at primary path corridors, linking the higher Promenade with the lower Civic Green.  Bridges allow all park users to experience the activity of the fountain interior from a dry prospect, adding a dramatic flair to park circulation, while referencing the waterfront’s pier and boardwalk heritage.

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Horticultural Gardens

Horticultural Gardens

East of the Promenade are smaller-scale garden rooms, designed as passive horticultural gardens in the north, and an active Family Area in the south.  The Grass Garden, Mediterranean Garden, and Diversity (sub tropical) Garden represent the extraordinary breadth of plant materials that thrive in California’s mild coastal climate.  Gardens and paths create a bold figure-ground pattern with seating and gathering spaces formed by the irregular confluences of paths.  The Family Area in the south includes multiple play structures, picnic tables, bocce, and a play hill with a large slide, set within an informal grove of flowering trees.  

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Horticultural Gardens

Horticultural Gardens

East of the Promenade are smaller-scale garden rooms, designed as passive horticultural gardens in the north, and an active Family Area in the south.  The Grass Garden, Mediterranean Garden, and Diversity (sub tropical) Garden represent the extraordinary breadth of plant materials that thrive in California’s mild coastal climate.  Gardens and paths create a bold figure-ground pattern with seating and gathering spaces formed by the irregular confluences of paths.  The Family Area in the south includes multiple play structures, picnic tables, bocce, and a play hill with a large slide, set within an informal grove of flowering trees.  

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Horticultural Gardens

Horticultural Gardens

East of the Promenade are smaller-scale garden rooms, designed as passive horticultural gardens in the north, and an active Family Area in the south.  The Grass Garden, Mediterranean Garden, and Diversity (sub tropical) Garden represent the extraordinary breadth of plant materials that thrive in California’s mild coastal climate.  Gardens and paths create a bold figure-ground pattern with seating and gathering spaces formed by the irregular confluences of paths.  The Family Area in the south includes multiple play structures, picnic tables, bocce, and a play hill with a large slide, set within an informal grove of flowering trees.  

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Public Art

Public Art

Garden gathering spaces create intimate venues for performances and events, private celebrations such as weddings and quinceaneras, and public art display.  Niki de Saint Phalle’s “Serpent Tree” creates a dramatic accent within the sub-tropical garden, while “Cat” provides a whimsical play opportunity within the Family Area.  Both sculptures are generously on loan from the Niki Charitable Art Foundation.      

Photo: Jacob Petersen

 

 

 

 

Historic County Administration Center

Historic County Administration Center

An estimated 25,000 people gathered on July 16, 1938 for the dedication of the County Administration Center on San Diego's bayfront.  The magnificent building was constructed with a $1M grant from the Works Progress Administration authorized by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who presided over the dedication ceremonies.

The CAC building has been a center of City and County administration since 1938, and with the opening of the Waterfront Park has begun a new chapter as one of downtown San Diego's premier recreational destinations.                                

Photo: County of San Diego

The Infinity

The Infinity

The Infinity’s residential towers and mid-rise buildings enclose a half-acre public courtyard constructed over several levels of underground parking and a swimming pool/fitness room.  A graphic waterwall and sculptural terraces define the edges of the courtyard, while lush planting islands float within courtyard plaza.  The dramatic vertically-oriented landscape engages the buildings at multiple levels and creates a striking visual landscape for surrounding residential units. 

Jacob Petersen was Project Manager and Principal-in-Charge of the Hargreaves Associates landscape design team, coordinating extensively with the City of San Francisco, design architect Arquitectonica, and architect of record Heller Manus.  

Infinity Courtyard

Infinity Courtyard

A two-story waterwall animates the sunnier edge of the courtyard while drawing daylight and the visual activity of cascading water into the edge of the fitness room below.  Sculptural seating terraces frame the opposite edge of the courtyard.  Large trapezoidal skylights integrated into the terraces bathe the swimming pool below in natural daylight.  Mounded planting islands with cantilevered steel benches float within the courtyard paving, creating a series of intimate garden seating spaces.

Photo: Jacob Petersen       

Infinity Courtyard

Infinity Courtyard

A two-story waterwall animates the sunnier edge of the courtyard while drawing daylight and the visual activity of cascading water into the edge of the fitness room below.  Sculptural seating terraces frame the opposite edge of the courtyard.  Large trapezoidal skylights integrated into the terraces bathe the swimming pool below in natural daylight.  Mounded planting islands with cantilevered steel benches float within the courtyard paving, creating a series of intimate garden seating spaces.

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Terraces and Skylights

Terraces and Skylights

Sculptural seating terraces frame the opposite edge of the courtyard.  Large trapezoidal skylights integrated into the terraces bathe the swimming pool below in natural daylight.  Mounded planting islands with cantilevered steel benches float within the courtyard paving, creating a series of intimate garden seating spaces.

Photo: Jacob Petersen        

Terraces and Skylights

Terraces and Skylights

Sculptural seating terraces frame the opposite edge of the courtyard.  Large trapezoidal skylights integrated into the terraces bathe the swimming pool below in natural daylight.  Mounded planting islands with cantilevered steel benches float within the courtyard paving, creating a series of intimate garden seating spaces.

Photo: Jacob Petersen 

Skylights and Pool

Skylights and Pool

Sculptural seating terraces frame the opposite edge of the courtyard.  Large trapezoidal skylights integrated into the terraces bathe the swimming pool below in natural daylight.  Mounded planting islands with cantilevered steel benches float within the courtyard paving, creating a series of intimate garden seating spaces.

                                  

Spear Street Stairs

Spear Street Stairs

The courtyard connects to Main Street at grade, and to Spear Street with grand stairs and planted terraces, accounting for the significant topographic change across the site.  A bamboo-planted corridor along the south property line creates a secondary public passage through the development.           

The half-block project included three distinct streetscape designs, each reflecting a different typology within the city’s street hierarchy.  The Spear Street “green street” integrates café spillout, seating niches, gardens, and small-scale recreation within the enclosure of a double row of trees, and is shown as a precedent in San Francisco's Better Streets manual.

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Spear Green Street

Spear Green Street

The half-block project included three distinct streetscape designs, each reflecting a different typology within the city’s street hierarchy.  The Spear Street “green street” integrates café spillout, seating niches, gardens, and small-scale recreation within the enclosure of a double row of trees, and is shown as a precedent in San Francisco's Better Streets manual.

Photo: Jacob Petersen

 

 

 

 

 

Bamboo Passage

Bamboo Passage

A thin screen of bamboo activates the blank wall of the adjoining development and enlivens a narrow secondary passage through the development.          

Photo: Jacob Petersen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parkview West

Parkview West

Parkview West, one block west of Chicago’s Navy Pier, integrates a dramatic high-rise condominium tower and podium townhouse building with a 1.75-acre park constructed entirely upon a multi-level underground garage.  The park is conceived as a series of folded planes, with each park facet articulated as a distinct regional landscape typology or park feature.  Interior park spaces are elevated slightly above street level, while seating terraces, cascading fountains, and access paths slope to engage perimeter streets.  The sculptural landscape complements the adjacent River East Arts Center, and provides a dynamic 3-season garden display for the enjoyment of residents in surrounding towers.   

Jacob Petersen, Principal-in-Charge of the Hargreaves Associates landscape design team, coordinated extensively with architect Solomon Cordwell Buenz, and garage structural engineers to realize the complex on-structure landscape.  Chicago Tribune architecture critic Blair Kamin praised the landscape: “An oasis of public space between Michigan Avenue and Navy Pier; origami-inspired park is deftly integrated with tower”.

Parkview West

Parkview West

Parkview West, one block west of Chicago’s Navy Pier, integrates a dramatic high-rise condominium tower and podium townhouse building with a 1.75-acre park constructed entirely upon a multi-level underground garage.  The park is conceived as a series of folded planes, with each park facet articulated as a distinct regional landscape typology or park feature.  Interior park spaces are elevated slightly above street level, while seating terraces, cascading fountains, and access paths slope to engage perimeter streets.  The sculptural landscape complements the adjacent River East Arts Center, and provides a dynamic 3-season garden display for the enjoyment of residents in surrounding towers.   

Jacob Petersen, Principal-in-Charge of the Hargreaves Associates landscape design team, coordinated extensively with architect Solomon Cordwell Buenz, and garage structural engineers to realize the complex on-structure landscape.  Chicago Tribune architecture critic Blair Kamin praised the landscape: “An oasis of public space between Michigan Avenue and Navy Pier; origami-inspired park is deftly integrated with tower”.

Parkview West

Parkview West

Parkview West, one block west of Chicago’s Navy Pier, integrates a dramatic high-rise condominium tower and podium townhouse building with a 1.75-acre park constructed entirely upon a multi-level underground garage.  The park is conceived as a series of folded planes, with each park facet articulated as a distinct regional landscape typology or park feature.  Interior park spaces are elevated slightly above street level, while seating terraces, cascading fountains, and access paths slope to engage perimeter streets.  The sculptural landscape complements the adjacent River East Arts Center, and provides a dynamic 3-season garden display for the enjoyment of residents in surrounding towers.  

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Parkview West

Parkview West

Parkview West, one block west of Chicago’s Navy Pier, integrates a dramatic high-rise condominium tower and podium townhouse building with a 1.75-acre park constructed entirely upon a multi-level underground garage.  The park is conceived as a series of folded planes, with each park facet articulated as a distinct regional landscape typology or park feature.  Interior park spaces are elevated slightly above street level, while seating terraces, cascading fountains, and access paths slope to engage perimeter streets.  The sculptural landscape complements the adjacent River East Arts Center, and provides a dynamic 3-season garden display for the enjoyment of residents in surrounding towers.   

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Parkview West

Parkview West

The developer’s initial vision for the landscape was to create a private park for condominium owners at podium level over an elevated garage, entirely separated from surrounding streets and traffic noise.   The City of Chicago, however, wanted the park be publicly accessible and developed at street-level, with the garage entirely underground.  The landscape design satisfies the needs of both parties.  The garage is partially elevated, yet entirely concealed within faceted park surfaces.  Sloped street-facing gardens, fountains, and terraces engage passing vehicles and pedestrians, while buffering interior recreational and seating areas from traffic noise.  The landscape is privately-owned and publicly accessible. 

Photo: Jacob Petersen   

Parkview West

Parkview West

The developer’s initial vision for the landscape was to create a private park for condominium owners at podium level over an elevated garage, entirely separated from surrounding streets and traffic noise.   The City of Chicago, however, wanted the park be publicly accessible and developed at street-level, with the garage entirely underground.  The landscape design satisfies the needs of both parties.  The garage is partially elevated, yet entirely concealed within faceted park surfaces.  Sloped street-facing gardens, fountains, and terraces engage passing vehicles and pedestrians, while buffering interior recreational and seating areas from traffic noise.  The landscape is privately-owned and publicly accessible.  

Photo: Jacob Petersen  

Parkview West

Parkview West

The developer’s initial vision for the landscape was to create a private park for condominium owners at podium level over an elevated garage, entirely separated from surrounding streets and traffic noise.   The City of Chicago, however, wanted the park be publicly accessible and developed at street-level, with the garage entirely underground.  The landscape design satisfies the needs of both parties.  The garage is partially elevated, yet entirely concealed within faceted park surfaces.  Sloped street-facing gardens, fountains, and terraces engage passing vehicles and pedestrians, while buffering interior recreational and seating areas from traffic noise.  The landscape is privately-owned and publicly accessible. 

Photo: Jacob Petersen   

Park Construction and Sustainability

Park Construction and Sustainability

The garage lid was faceted in parallel with the sloping planes of the park, creating a uniform shallow layer of planting soil over the structure.  This required close collaboration between landscape design team and garage structural engineers.  Increased soil depth at tree groves was achieved by locally depressing the garage slab to the bottom of the concrete beams. 

Horticulturist Galen Gates of the Chicago Botanic Gardens was engaged to help develop a plant palette that would thrive in this challenging on-structure, lakeside installation.  Tough regional native plants are utilized throughout the park, and stormwater is directed to rock-filled infiltration basins along the edges of the garage.    

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Park Construction and Sustainability

Park Construction and Sustainability

The garage lid was faceted in parallel with the sloping planes of the park, creating a uniform shallow layer of planting soil over the structure.  This required close collaboration between landscape design team and garage structural engineers.  Increased soil depth at tree groves was achieved by locally depressing the garage slab to the bottom of the concrete beams. 

Horticulturist Galen Gates of the Chicago Botanic Gardens was engaged to help develop a plant palette that would thrive in this challenging on-structure, lakeside installation.  Tough regional native plants are utilized throughout the park, and stormwater is directed to rock-filled infiltration basins along the edges of the garage.    

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Park Construction and Sustainability

Park Construction and Sustainability

The garage lid was faceted in parallel with the sloping planes of the park, creating a uniform shallow layer of planting soil over the structure.  This required close collaboration between landscape design team and garage structural engineers.  Increased soil depth at tree groves was achieved by locally depressing the garage slab to the bottom of the concrete beams. 

Horticulturist Galen Gates of the Chicago Botanic Gardens was engaged to help develop a plant palette that would thrive in this challenging on-structure, lakeside installation.  Tough regional native plants are utilized throughout the park, and stormwater is directed to rock-filled infiltration basins along the edges of the garage.    

Photo: Jacob Petersen    

ResMed Corporate Headquarters

ResMed Corporate Headquarters

ResMed’s Corporate Headquarters Campus integrates 230,000 sf office space, dining and event facilities, and a 766 stall parking garage within a dramatic 7-acre campus defined by sweeping bands of native and drought tolerant perennials.  Outdoor amenities including an arrival courtyard, a tree-shaded café plaza, a great lawn, and a series of walking paths. 

Jacob Petersen was Principal-in-Charge of the Hargreaves Associates campus design team.  The San Diego Architectural Foundation awarded the design a 2009 Orchid Award; “The campus of the ResMed Corporation is a startling good example of artistic landscape design for a commercial building….plantings were carefully designed to be drought tolerant, and the paving materials allow water to percolate….. public spaces are welcoming, comfortable, and safe.....integration of large scale modern artwork is a pleasant surprise.”

Photo: Jacob Petersen

ResMed Corporate Headquarters

ResMed Corporate Headquarters

ResMed’s Corporate Headquarters Campus integrates 230,000 sf office space, dining and event facilities, and a 766 stall parking garage within a dramatic 7-acre campus defined by sweeping bands of native and drought tolerant perennials.  Outdoor amenities including an arrival courtyard, a tree-shaded café plaza, a great lawn, and a series of walking paths. 

Jacob Petersen was Principal-in-Charge of the Hargreaves Associates campus design team.  The San Diego Architectural Foundation awarded the design a 2009 Orchid Award; “The campus of the ResMed Corporation is a startling good example of artistic landscape design for a commercial building….plantings were carefully designed to be drought tolerant, and the paving materials allow water to percolate….. public spaces are welcoming, comfortable, and safe.....integration of large scale modern artwork is a pleasant surprise.”

Photo: Jacob Petersen

ResMed Corporate Headquarters

ResMed Corporate Headquarters

ResMed’s Corporate Headquarters Campus integrates 230,000 sf office space, dining and event facilities, and a 766 stall parking garage within a dramatic 7-acre campus defined by sweeping bands of native and drought tolerant perennials.  Outdoor amenities including an arrival courtyard, a tree-shaded café plaza, a great lawn, and a series of walking paths. 

Jacob Petersen was Principal-in-Charge of the Hargreaves Associates campus design team.  The San Diego Architectural Foundation awarded the design a 2009 Orchid Award; “The campus of the ResMed Corporation is a startling good example of artistic landscape design for a commercial building….plantings were carefully designed to be drought tolerant, and the paving materials allow water to percolate….. public spaces are welcoming, comfortable, and safe.....integration of large scale modern artwork is a pleasant surprise.”

Photo: Jacob Petersen

ResMed Corporate Headquarters

ResMed Corporate Headquarters

ResMed’s Corporate Headquarters Campus integrates 230,000 sf office space, dining and event facilities, and a 766 stall parking garage within a dramatic 7-acre campus defined by sweeping bands of native and drought tolerant perennials.  Outdoor amenities including an arrival courtyard, a tree-shaded café plaza, a great lawn, and a series of walking paths. 

Jacob Petersen was Principal-in-Charge of the Hargreaves Associates campus design team.  The San Diego Architectural Foundation awarded the design a 2009 Orchid Award; “The campus of the ResMed Corporation is a startling good example of artistic landscape design for a commercial building….plantings were carefully designed to be drought tolerant, and the paving materials allow water to percolate….. public spaces are welcoming, comfortable, and safe.....integration of large scale modern artwork is a pleasant surprise.”

Photo: Jacob Petersen

ResMed Corporate Headquarters

ResMed Corporate Headquarters

ResMed’s Corporate Headquarters Campus integrates 230,000 sf office space, dining and event facilities, and a 766 stall parking garage within a dramatic 7-acre campus defined by sweeping bands of native and drought tolerant perennials.  Outdoor amenities including an arrival courtyard, a tree-shaded café plaza, a great lawn, and a series of walking paths. 

Jacob Petersen was Principal-in-Charge of the Hargreaves Associates campus design team.  The San Diego Architectural Foundation awarded the design a 2009 Orchid Award; “The campus of the ResMed Corporation is a startling good example of artistic landscape design for a commercial building….plantings were carefully designed to be drought tolerant, and the paving materials allow water to percolate….. public spaces are welcoming, comfortable, and safe.....integration of large scale modern artwork is a pleasant surprise.”

Photo: Jacob Petersen

ResMed Corporate Headquarters

ResMed Corporate Headquarters

ResMed’s Corporate Headquarters Campus integrates 230,000 sf office space, dining and event facilities, and a 766 stall parking garage within a dramatic 7-acre campus defined by sweeping bands of native and drought tolerant perennials.  Outdoor amenities including an arrival courtyard, a tree-shaded café plaza, a great lawn, and a series of walking paths. 

Jacob Petersen was Principal-in-Charge of the Hargreaves Associates campus design team.  The San Diego Architectural Foundation awarded the design a 2009 Orchid Award; “The campus of the ResMed Corporation is a startling good example of artistic landscape design for a commercial building….plantings were carefully designed to be drought tolerant, and the paving materials allow water to percolate….. public spaces are welcoming, comfortable, and safe.....integration of large scale modern artwork is a pleasant surprise.”

Photo: Jacob Petersen

ResMed Corporate Headquarters

ResMed Corporate Headquarters

ResMed’s Corporate Headquarters Campus integrates 230,000 sf office space, dining and event facilities, and a 766 stall parking garage within a dramatic 7-acre campus defined by sweeping bands of native and drought tolerant perennials.  Outdoor amenities including an arrival courtyard, a tree-shaded café plaza, a great lawn, and a series of walking paths. 

Jacob Petersen was Principal-in-Charge of the Hargreaves Associates campus design team.  The San Diego Architectural Foundation awarded the design a 2009 Orchid Award; “The campus of the ResMed Corporation is a startling good example of artistic landscape design for a commercial building….plantings were carefully designed to be drought tolerant, and the paving materials allow water to percolate….. public spaces are welcoming, comfortable, and safe.....integration of large scale modern artwork is a pleasant surprise.”

Photo: Jacob Petersen

ResMed Corporate Headquarters

ResMed Corporate Headquarters

ResMed’s Corporate Headquarters Campus integrates 230,000 sf office space, dining and event facilities, and a 766 stall parking garage within a dramatic 7-acre campus defined by sweeping bands of native and drought tolerant perennials.  Outdoor amenities including an arrival courtyard, a tree-shaded café plaza, a great lawn, and a series of walking paths. 

Jacob Petersen was Principal-in-Charge of the Hargreaves Associates campus design team.  The San Diego Architectural Foundation awarded the design a 2009 Orchid Award; “The campus of the ResMed Corporation is a startling good example of artistic landscape design for a commercial building….plantings were carefully designed to be drought tolerant, and the paving materials allow water to percolate….. public spaces are welcoming, comfortable, and safe.....integration of large scale modern artwork is a pleasant surprise.”

Photo: Jacob Petersen

ResMed Corporate Headquarters

ResMed Corporate Headquarters

ResMed’s Corporate Headquarters Campus integrates 230,000 sf office space, dining and event facilities, and a 766 stall parking garage within a dramatic 7-acre campus defined by sweeping bands of native and drought tolerant perennials.  Outdoor amenities including an arrival courtyard, a tree-shaded café plaza, a great lawn, and a series of walking paths. 

Jacob Petersen was Principal-in-Charge of the Hargreaves Associates campus design team.  The San Diego Architectural Foundation awarded the design a 2009 Orchid Award; “The campus of the ResMed Corporation is a startling good example of artistic landscape design for a commercial building….plantings were carefully designed to be drought tolerant, and the paving materials allow water to percolate….. public spaces are welcoming, comfortable, and safe.....integration of large scale modern artwork is a pleasant surprise.”

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Regional Law Enforcement Memorial

Regional Law Enforcement Memorial

The Regional Law Enforcement Memorial celebrates the lives and service of all branches of law enforcement in San Diego County.  The glass “Wall of Light” is internally illuminated, creating a beacon of remembrance along San Diego’s waterfront.  The names of fallen officers are etched upon the ephemeral glass surface, without hierarchy, or structure.  The intentional lack of order alludes to the timelessness and commonality of service and sacrifice.  Translucent words such as "honor", "duty", and "courage" float within the illuminated glass wall, representing the shared core values of law enforcement.

Jacob Petersen, Principal-in-Charge of the Hargreaves Associates design team, worked closely with Memorial Foundation representatives to refine content and meaning. 

Photo: Memorial Foundation 

 

 

 

 

Regional Law Enforcement Memorial

Regional Law Enforcement Memorial

The glass wall is internally illuminated with cool white light, creating a beacon of remembrance along San Diego’s waterfront.  When an officer falls, wall lighting changes to blue, sharing the loss with the larger San Diego community.  The wall remains blue until the memorial ceremony occurs, and the new name is etched into the glass.  Flowers and pencil rubbings of etched names are often left on the granite plinth by daily visitors.  Hundreds of officers gather for the annual memorial ceremony each May.

Photo: Kathy Flynn

    

Regional Law Enforcement Memorial

Regional Law Enforcement Memorial

The glass wall is internally illuminated with cool white light, creating a beacon of remembrance along San Diego’s waterfront.  When an officer falls, wall lighting changes to blue, sharing the loss with the larger San Diego community.  The wall remains blue until the memorial ceremony occurs, and the new name is etched into the glass.  Flowers and pencil rubbings of etched names are often left on the granite plinth by daily visitors.  Hundreds of officers gather for the annual memorial ceremony each May.

Photo: Kathy Flynn

 

Regional Law Enforcement Memorial

Regional Law Enforcement Memorial

The glass wall is internally illuminated with cool white light, creating a beacon of remembrance along San Diego’s waterfront.  When an officer falls, wall lighting changes to blue, sharing the loss with the larger San Diego community.  The wall remains blue until the memorial ceremony occurs, and the new name is etched into the glass.  Flowers and pencil rubbings of etched names are often left on the granite plinth by daily visitors.  Hundreds of officers gather for the annual memorial ceremony each May.

Photo: Kathy Flynn

 

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Potrero Residence

Potrero Residence

The residential garden designed by Jacob Petersen and Lara Rose is defined by a dramatic angular deck framed by bold masses of decorative grasses and perennials.  The central deck terminates in a seating terrace along the edge of the bocce court.  The large deck and bocce court provide ample outdoor entertainment and dining opportunities.  The terraced landscape gracefully mitigates 5+ feet of grade change between the house and the garden, enhancing indoor-outdoor connectivity.  Feather reed grass, wild rye, salvia, and olive trees create an attractive drought-tolerant and low-maintenance garden palette suitable to San Francisco’s Mediterranean climate.  

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Potrero Residence

Potrero Residence

The residential garden designed by Jacob Petersen and Lara Rose is defined by a dramatic angular deck framed by bold masses of decorative grasses and perennials.  The central deck terminates in a seating terrace along the edge of the bocce court.  The large deck and bocce court provide ample outdoor entertainment and dining opportunities.  The terraced landscape gracefully mitigates 5+ feet of grade change between the house and the garden, enhancing indoor-outdoor connectivity.  Feather reed grass, wild rye, salvia, and olive trees create an attractive drought-tolerant and low-maintenance garden palette suitable to San Francisco’s Mediterranean climate.  

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Potrero Residence

Potrero Residence

The residential garden designed by Jacob Petersen and Lara Rose is defined by a dramatic angular deck framed by bold masses of decorative grasses and perennials.  The central deck terminates in a seating terrace along the edge of the bocce court.  The large deck and bocce court provide ample outdoor entertainment and dining opportunities.  The terraced landscape gracefully mitigates 5+ feet of grade change between the house and the garden, enhancing indoor-outdoor connectivity.  Feather reed grass, wild rye, salvia, and olive trees create an attractive drought-tolerant and low-maintenance garden palette suitable to San Francisco’s Mediterranean climate.   

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Potrero Residence

Potrero Residence

The residential garden designed by Jacob Petersen and Lara Rose is defined by a dramatic angular deck framed by bold masses of decorative grasses and perennials.  The central deck terminates in a seating terrace along the edge of the bocce court.  The large deck and bocce court provide ample outdoor entertainment and dining opportunities.  The terraced landscape gracefully mitigates 5+ feet of grade change between the house and the garden, enhancing indoor-outdoor connectivity.  Feather reed grass, wild rye, salvia, and olive trees create an attractive drought-tolerant and low-maintenance garden palette suitable to San Francisco’s Mediterranean climate.   

Photo: Jacob Petersen

Potrero Residence

Potrero Residence

The residential garden designed by Jacob Petersen and Lara Rose is defined by a dramatic angular deck framed by bold masses of decorative grasses and perennials.  The central deck terminates in a seating terrace along the edge of the bocce court.  The large deck and bocce court provide ample outdoor entertainment and dining opportunities.  The terraced landscape gracefully mitigates 5+ feet of grade change between the house and the garden, enhancing indoor-outdoor connectivity.  Feather reed grass, wild rye, salvia, and olive trees create an attractive drought-tolerant and low-maintenance garden palette suitable to San Francisco’s Mediterranean climate.  

Photo: Charles Smith

Potrero Residence

Potrero Residence

The residential garden designed by Jacob Petersen and Lara Rose is defined by a dramatic angular deck framed by bold masses of decorative grasses and perennials.  The central deck terminates in a seating terrace along the edge of the bocce court.  The large deck and bocce court provide ample outdoor entertainment and dining opportunities.  The terraced landscape gracefully mitigates 5+ feet of grade change between the house and the garden, enhancing indoor-outdoor connectivity.  Feather reed grass, wild rye, salvia, and olive trees create an attractive drought-tolerant and low-maintenance garden palette suitable to San Francisco’s Mediterranean climate.  

Photo: Charles Smith

 

Potrero Residence

Potrero Residence

The residential garden designed by Jacob Petersen and Lara Rose is defined by a dramatic angular deck framed by bold masses of decorative grasses and perennials.  The central deck terminates in a seating terrace along the edge of the bocce court.  The large deck and bocce court provide ample outdoor entertainment and dining opportunities.  The terraced landscape gracefully mitigates 5+ feet of grade change between the house and the garden, enhancing indoor-outdoor connectivity.  Feather reed grass, wild rye, salvia, and olive trees create an attractive drought-tolerant and low-maintenance garden palette suitable to San Francisco’s Mediterranean climate.   

 

MAPS 3 Downtown Public Park Master Plan

MAPS 3 Downtown Public Park Master Plan

Oklahoma City’s Downtown Public Park Master Plan establishes the design vision and programming for the ambitious $80M, 70-acre central park linking the downtown core to the riverfront.  The mile-long park will become downtown’s premier outdoor recreation and entertainment destination, and a major catalyst for revitalization of the Core to Shore District, providing the open space armature for the next 50-75 years of downtown growth. 

Jacob Petersen was Principal-in-Charge of the Downtown Park Master Plan, with prime firm Hargreaves Associates.  The Master Plan was adopted in 2014.  Park construction is scheduled to be completed by 2021.  A PDF of the complete Master Plan is available on the city’s MAPS 3 website:  Downtown Public Park Master Plan PDF

Image: City of Oklahoma City, MAPS 3 Downtown Public Park Master Plan, prepared by Hargreaves Associates  

  Image: City of Oklahoma City, MAPS 3 Downtown Public Park Master Plan, prepared by Hargreaves Associates 

Image: City of Oklahoma City, MAPS 3 Downtown Public Park Master Plan, prepared by Hargreaves Associates 

  Image: City of Oklahoma City, MAPS 3 Downtown Public Park Master Plan, prepared by Hargreaves Associates 

Image: City of Oklahoma City, MAPS 3 Downtown Public Park Master Plan, prepared by Hargreaves Associates 

  Image: City of Oklahoma City, MAPS 3 Downtown Public Park Master Plan, prepared by Hargreaves Associates 

Image: City of Oklahoma City, MAPS 3 Downtown Public Park Master Plan, prepared by Hargreaves Associates 

  Image: City of Oklahoma City, MAPS 3 Downtown Public Park Master Plan, prepared by Hargreaves Associates 

Image: City of Oklahoma City, MAPS 3 Downtown Public Park Master Plan, prepared by Hargreaves Associates 

  Image: City of Oklahoma City, MAPS 3 Downtown Public Park Master Plan, prepared by Hargreaves Associates 

Image: City of Oklahoma City, MAPS 3 Downtown Public Park Master Plan, prepared by Hargreaves Associates 

  Image: City of Oklahoma City, MAPS 3 Downtown Public Park Master Plan, prepared by Hargreaves Associates 

Image: City of Oklahoma City, MAPS 3 Downtown Public Park Master Plan, prepared by Hargreaves Associates 

  Image: City of Oklahoma City, MAPS 3 Downtown Public Park Master Plan, prepared by Hargreaves Associates 

Image: City of Oklahoma City, MAPS 3 Downtown Public Park Master Plan, prepared by Hargreaves Associates 

  Image: City of Oklahoma City, MAPS 3 Downtown Public Park Master Plan, prepared by Hargreaves Associates 

Image: City of Oklahoma City, MAPS 3 Downtown Public Park Master Plan, prepared by Hargreaves Associates 

Schematic Model

Schematic Model

The Mountain House is located on the edge of a 5-acre meadow surrounded by redwood forest in northern California’s steep coastal mountains.  Construction of the original eccentric post-and-beam house was initiated in the 1970’s as a private mountain retreat.  Current owners wanted to expand and modernize the off-the-grid house to accommodate a growing family, and strengthen indoor-outdoor relationships.  Petersen Studio designed a sequence of interrelated decks, stairs, and terraces that unfold from the house to engage the surrounding meadow and forest.  The hillside design gracefully integrates 40’ of vertical grade change.       

On the uphill side of the house, a new entry stair and retaining wall provides access from the parking area above and protects the rooting area of a large redwood tree from required site grading.  On the downhill side of the house, the folding glass wall of the new living room opens onto broad splayed stairs and a gravel terrace with a fire ring.  The central lawn terrace accommodates family dining and play, and the lawn overlooks a sculptural pool deck embedded within the existing meadow. 

House renovations and extensive rough grading have been completed.  Phased landscape improvements are under construction.

Mountain House

Mountain House

The Mountain House is located on the edge of a 5-acre meadow surrounded by redwood forest in northern California’s steep coastal mountains.  Construction of the original eccentric post-and-beam house was initiated in the 1970’s as a private mountain retreat.  Current owners wanted to expand and modernize the off-the-grid house to accommodate a growing family, and strengthen indoor-outdoor relationships.  Petersen Studio designed a sequence of interrelated decks, stairs, and terraces that unfold from the house to engage the surrounding meadow and forest.  The hillside design gracefully integrates 40’ of vertical grade change.       

On the uphill side of the house, a new entry stair and retaining wall provides access from the parking area above and protects the rooting area of a large redwood tree from required site grading.  On the downhill side of the house, the folding glass wall of the new living room opens onto broad splayed stairs and a gravel terrace with a fire ring.  The central lawn terrace accommodates family dining and play, and the lawn overlooks a sculptural pool deck embedded within the existing meadow. 

House renovations and extensive rough grading have been completed.  Phased landscape improvements are under construction.

Entry Stair and Retaining Wall

Entry Stair and Retaining Wall

On the uphill side of the house, a new entry stair and retaining wall provides access from the parking area above and protects the rooting area of a large redwood tree from required site grading.  

Entry Stair and Retaining Wall

Entry Stair and Retaining Wall

On the uphill side of the house, a new entry stair and retaining wall provides access from the parking area above and protects the rooting area of a large redwood tree from required site grading.  

Splay Stairs and Fire Terrace

Splay Stairs and Fire Terrace

On the downhill side of the house, the folding glass wall of the new living room opens onto broad splayed stairs and a gravel terrace with a fire ring.  The central lawn terrace accommodates family dining and play.  The lawn overlooks a sculptural pool deck embedded within the existing meadow. 

Splay Stairs and Fire Terrace

Splay Stairs and Fire Terrace

On the downhill side of the house, the folding glass wall of the new living room opens onto broad splayed stairs and a gravel terrace with a fire ring.  The central lawn terrace accommodates family dining and play.  The lawn overlooks a sculptural pool deck embedded within the existing meadow.    

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